• Adv. Atmos. Sci.  2018, Vol. 35 Issue (9): 1145-1159    DOI: 10.1007/s00376-018-7212-9
    Source Contributions to PM2.5 under Unfavorable Weather Conditions in Guangzhou City, China
    Nan WANG1(), Zhenhao LING2, Xuejiao DENG1, Tao DENG1, Xiaopu LYU3, Tingyuan LI4, Xiaorong GAO5, Xi CHEN6
    1Institute of Tropical and Marine Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, Guangzhou 510000, China
    2School of Atmospheric Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510000, China
    3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong 999077, China
    4Ecological Meteorology Center, Guangdong Provincial Meteorological Bureau, Guangzhou 510000, China
    5Guangzhou Meteorological Observatory, Guangzhou 510000, China
    6School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510000, China
    Abstract
    Abstract  

    Historical haze episodes (2013-16) in Guangzhou were examined and classified according to synoptic weather systems. Four types of weather systems were found to be unfavorable, among which "foreside of a cold front" (FC) and "sea high pressure" (SP) were the most frequent (>75% of the total). Targeted case studies were conducted based on an FC-affected event and an SP-affected event with the aim of understanding the characteristics of the contributions of source regions to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Guangzhou. Four kinds of contributions——namely, emissions outside Guangdong Province (super-region), emissions from the Pearl River Delta region (PRD region), emissions from Guangzhou-Foshan-Shenzhen (GFS region), and emissions from Guangzhou (local)——were investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Community Multiscale Air Quality model. The results showed that the source region contribution differed with different weather systems. SP was a stagnant weather condition, and the source region contribution ratio showed that the local region was a major contributor (37%), while the PRD region, GFS region and the super-region only contributed 8%, 2.8% and 7%, respectively, to PM2.5 concentrations. By contrast, FC favored regional transport. The super-region became noticeable, contributing 34.8%, while the local region decreased to 12%. A simple method was proposed to quantify the relative impact of meteorology and emissions. Meteorology had a 35% impact, compared with an impact of -18% for emissions, when comparing the FC-affected event with that of the SP. The results from this study can provide guidance to policymakers for the implementation of effective control strategies.

    Just Accepted Date: 14 March 2018   Issue Date: 20 June 2018
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    Articles by authors
    Nan WANG
    Zhenhao LING
    Xuejiao DENG
    Tao DENG
    Xiaopu LYU
    Tingyuan LI
    Xiaorong GAO
    Xi CHEN
    Cite this article:   
    Nan WANG,Zhenhao LING,Xuejiao DENG, et al. Source Contributions to PM2.5 under Unfavorable Weather Conditions in Guangzhou City, China[J]. Adv. Atmos. Sci., 2018, 35(9): 1145 -1159 .
    URL:  
    http://159.226.119.58/aas/EN/10.1007/s00376-018-7212-9     OR     
    http://159.226.119.58/aas/EN/Y2018/V35/I9/1145
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